QEII Loses Longstanding Chimney Stack

QEII Loses Longstanding Chimney Stack

Western Australia Minister for Health Kim Hames

Chimney Stack Comes Down At QEII

Victor P Taffa

  • Demolition to start on landmark ‘chimney’ stack at QEII Medical Centre
  • Follows new CEP coming online/new multi-deck car park opened this month

Demolition is set to begin on the landmark ‘chimney’ stack at the QEII Medical Centre site, Health Minister Kim Hames said today.

Dr. Hames said the 70m high chimney, which is part of the old Central Energy Plant (CEP) adjacent to Winthrop Avenue, would be removed to allow construction to continue on the multi-deck car park and new children’s hospital on Winthrop Avenue.

The CEP has been replaced with a new $225 Million facility to meet the increasing demands of current and planned new services at the site.

Construction on the new CEP began in February 2011 at the western end of the site, and it was commissioned to service the site this month.

“The new CEP comprises all mechanical and electrical services to provide high temperature hot water, chilled water, emergency power, medical gases and reverse osmosis water for clinical use.” the Minister said.

“Diesel generators will provide electricity in the very rare event of a ‘power blackout’ on-site and could provide sufficient emergency power to supply a town the size of Margaret River.”

QEII Medical Centre Trust Chairman Steven Cole said it was an exciting time at the site, with the first major milestones reached since the redevelopment began in 2010.

“The transformation of the QEII Medical Centre is well under way and the site looks vastly different from this time last year.” Mr. Cole said.

Fact File

  • By 2015, CEP will support the following facilities:  expanded Cancer Centre, Diagnostic Pathology Centre, WA Institute of Medical Research, new children’s hospital, new SCGH Mental Health Unit and Ronald McDonald House
  • Multi-deck car park will also be completed as part of Stage 1 redevelopment, delivering  more than 3,000 parking bays, bringing by 2015 more than 5,000 bays on site