In Sport

Northern Territory Attorney-General John Elferink

Tougher Penalties For Match Fixing

Victor P Taffa

The Northern Territory Government has today passed legislation to protect the integrity of professional sport by ensuring that those engaged in match-fixing face serious penalties.

Amendments to the Criminal Code (Cheating at Gambling) Bill will see the introduction of five new offences to prohibit cheating or fraud in sports betting.

Attorney-General John Elferink said match-fixing is a serious offence and tougher penalties will act as a deterrent for those considering participating in such activities.

 

“The changes are part of a national push to protect the integrity of Australian sport.” Mr. Elferink said.

“This follows an agreement by state and territory governments to provide a consistent approach to cheating and fraud in sport.”

The five new offences include:

  • Engaging in conduct that corrupts a betting outcome – maximum penalty of 7 years imprisonment;
  • Facilitating conduct that corrupts a betting outcome – maximum penalty of 7 years imprisonment;
  • Concealing from authorities conduct or an agreement about conduct that corrupts the betting outcome – maximum penalty of 7 years imprisonment;
  • Using corrupt conduct information for betting purposes – maximum penalty of 7 years imprisonment;
  • Using inside information for betting purposes – maximum penalty of 2 years imprisonment.

Minister for Sport and Recreation Matt Conlan said there was no place for match-fixing in Territory sport.

“Territorians want, and expect, our elite athletes and sporting competitions to be clean.” Mr. Conlan said.

“The Territory Government has introduced this important legislation after I attended a meeting of all Australian Sport Ministers in February and the former Labor Government stalled its progress.”

“This new legislation will safeguard Territory sport.” Mr. Conlan said.

The issue of drugs in sport has been handled appallingly by the Gillard and Rudd Governments. Legal action should have been pursued through Police and if appropriate charges should have been laid. The Courts are where these matters are determined and not on a Television Program.

The drugs in sport matter have been treated like a Spanish Inquisition or Kangaroo Court and not by due process that the Gillard and Rudd Governments should have proceeded to. The Gillard and Rudd Governments have sat on their hands and waited until five minutes to midnight when the Rudd Government was in care taker mode and thus unable to pursue these matters.

This course of delaying tactics has been deliberate so as not to get football fans in the Australian Football League (AFL) and National Rugby League (NRL) offside during an election campaign. The Rudd Government has left its dirty work up to the NRL and AFL.

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