In Resources

Western Australia Minister for Water Graham Jacobs

Water Minister Announces Upgrade To Busselton Wastewater Treatment Plant

Victor P Taffa

To keep pace with population growth, the Western Australia State Government will start building a $23 Million upgrade of Busselton’s wastewater treatment plant by December with works expected to be finished by mid-2012.

The plant plays an important role in protecting the environment and public health by removing pollutants from the community’s wastewater before it is returned to the environment or reused.

Water Minister Graham Jacobs said new technology employed for the upgrade would reduce the amount of nutrient entering Geographe Bay.

“The upgrade will increase the plant’s treatment capacity to 6.75 Million litres a day with design capability to treat additional flows when needed.” Dr. Jacobs said.

 

 

“The works will include new ‘oxidation ditch’ technology to reduce the nutrient concentration of treated wastewater by half, compared to the current facility.”

“That means there will be no increase in nutrient load leaving the upgraded plant, which will continue to be regulated under currently approved licence limits.”

“Even though treated wastewater is a relatively small contributor of nutrient, this reduction will complement the work being done by the Shire of Busselton, Department of Water and GeoCatch to improve the health of Geographe Bay.”

The Minister said the Water Corporation would also incorporate new advances into its effluent monitoring regime to help inform plant management and future planning.

“Monitoring will continue to ensure Busselton’s wastewater flows are safely managed into the future.” the Minister said.

“As water efficiency is a Busselton Shire Planning Priority, we expect this will also include more reuse opportunities.”

“Recycling is a corporate priority and we hope to complement our existing recycling arrangement with the Busselton Golf Course wherever possible.”

Dr. Jacobs said the project would also include improvements to the plant’s inlet works to assist in odour management.

“The inlet works are a major source of odour at the plant and concealing the inlet components will help.” the Minister said.

Construction contracts for the upgrade will be let in the final quarter of 2010 and the corporation’s policy is to maximise opportunities for local participation.

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